The Morning Scroll: UK Government To Investigate Reality TV’s Aftercare Process & Missouri State Senate Passes Bill That’ll Ban Abortions After 8 Weeks

Morning! While you were sleeping (or staying up to binge-watch Friends for the tenth time, or pulling an all-nighter in the library), a few things went down that you’ll probably want to know about. So grab a cup of coffee, settle in, and get scrolling.

What In The World 

UK reality television show, The Jeremy Kyle Show, was officially pulled off-air after the death of a guest that appeared on the show two weeks ago. ITV announced on Thursday that the show would be canceled due to concerns over contestants aftercare process.  Another ITV show, Love Island, also experience two deaths from former contestants, further adding to the conversation about reality television and mental health. Parliament will now launch an inquiry into reality TV and the dangers it poses on the mental health of contestants, The Guardian reports.

After the cancellation, the Digital, Culture, Media, and Sports Select Committee launched an inquiry that will “examine the current practices of broadcasters and producers,” as well as what can be improved about reality shows aftercare system, The Digital Spy reports. “ITV has made the right decision to permanently cancel The Jeremy Kyle Show. However, that should not be the end of the matter,” DCMS Committee Chair Damian Collins MP said, in a press release on the committee's site. “There needs to be an independent review of the duty of care TV companies have to participants in reality TV shows and the DCMS select committee has decided to hold an inquiry this summer into these issues.” 

He added: “Programmes like The Jeremy Kyle Show risk putting people who might be vulnerable on to a public stage at a point in their lives when they are unable to foresee the consequences, either for themselves of their families. This kind of TV featuring members of the public attracts viewing figures in the millions but in return for ratings, the broadcasters must demonstrate their duty of care to the people whose personal lives are being exposed. With an increasing demand for this type of programming, we’ll be examining broadcasting regulation in this area—is it fit for purpose?” 

The Select Committee will open the inquiry to the public, organizations or anyone else will relevant expertise to help answer the terms outlined on their site. This includes psychological support provided by production companies, how the aftercare process could be improved, and whether or not reality tv shows put “unfair psychological pressure on participants.” The deadline for submissions is June 13 at 5 p.m.

Rumor Has It 

After Ben Affleck turned his wings, a new Batman has been reportedly named. Variety reported on Thursday that Robert Pattinson will star in The Batman. 

Okay, it’s reportedly not *officially, officially*  confirmed. Deadline reported at the same time that Warner Bros. hasn’t actually chosen Pattison for Batman, but he was on the shortlist for the role along with Nicholas Hoult (of Warm Bodies, Skins, and X-Men: Dark Pheonix fame). According to The Hollywood Reporter, Pattinson is the frontrunner for the role.

Variety reported that the Twilight franchise actor would play in Matt Reeves’ upcoming movie about the superhero, which is set to film in late 2019 and early 2020. If chosen, he would take over the Batman role for Ben Affleck who starred in the 2016 movies Batman V. Superman: Dawn of Justice and Suicide Squad, as well as the 2017 movies Justice League. Pattison, 32, would be the youngest actor ever to play the superhero, Variety reported.  

Naturally, fans took to Twitter to express their mixed reactions to the casting choice. 

Then This Happened

After controversial anti-abortion laws passed in both Georgia and Alabama, Missouri’s state Senate passed a bill that would severely restrict reproductive rights for people. 

On Thursday, CNN reported that the state Senate voted to pass HB126 or Missouri Stands for the Unborn Act, which would ban abortions after eight weeks of pregnancy. The bill would only allow abortions in cases of medical emergencies, however, it would still be banned in cases of pregnancies caused by rape or incest. According to TIME, the bill would also ban abortions based on race, sex or “prenatal diagnosis, test, or screening indicating Down Syndrome or the potential of Down Syndrome.” Minors wanting an abortion would need to notify both parents, but there are some exceptions to this. According to NBC News, the bill would also include a “trigger function,” meaning that abortions would be banned in all circumstances (unless the health of the parent is at risk) if Roe v. Wade is overturned.

The Republican-led Senate passed the bill by a 24-10 vote, but the legislation still needs to pass through Missouri’s House of Representatives before the Friday, May 17 deadline. If it is passed, the bill will be in the hands of Gov. Mike Parson, who is expected to sign the bill. According to Slate, Parson has said he would sign the bill. 

“I made a promise to all Missourians that I would continue advocating and promoting a culture of life here in Missouri,” Parson said in a news conference. He also said the act would make Missouri “one of the strongest pro-life states in the country.”

This comes just one day after Alabama Gov. Kay Ivey signed the Human Life Protection Act on Wednesday, which banned nearly all abortions except in cases where the parent’s health is at risk.

Happy Thoughts 

You can send your long-distance BFF’s an edible unicorn bouquet. It’s not only cute, but it’s just one of the many ways to show that you’re thinking of them. 

via GIPHY