'Female Viagra' Gets Approval From the FDA

Last week, an FDA committee (in a vote of 18-6) approved a drug that's being referred to as “female Viagra.” The drug works to combat sexual dysfunction in premenopausal women. Many women have been asking for a “little pink pill” like this for years, claiming that the FDA has shown sexism in its approval of drugs. Viagra was approved back in 1998 and this new female drug has been through three review processes with the FDA since 2010. The FDA claims that it’s just trying to keep women safe.

"The FDA strives to protect and advance all important areas of women's health," according to FDA spokeswoman Andrea Fischer, "including disorders of female sexual function."

The drug's real name is flibanserin and, despite its function, works differently than Viagra does. Instead of having a solely physical effect (which is how Viagra works), this new drug works more similarly to an antidepressant in order to get women in the mood.

Several women participating in the clinical trial testified on Thursday.

“My desire for sex has left the building like Elvis’s blue suede shoes,” Amanda Parrish said to the FDA committee.

After using the drug, Parrish says she has seen marked improvements. She puts it this way: “As if a light switch had been turned on, so was I.”

This new drug, once available, will help older women, as well as women who've gone into early menopause or have had early-life hysterectomies. Many are calling this a step in the right direction for sexual equality. What are your thoughts, collegiettes?