Kim Kardashian Slams Bette Midler & Chloe Grace Moretz for Criticizing Her Nude Photo

Kim Kardashian caused a media frenzy yesterday by posting on Instagram a censored yet completely naked picture of herself. As always, there were a number of critics unhappy with Kardashian’s choice to publicly share a nude selfie. Most notably, Beaches actress Bette Midler and Hugo actress Chloe Grace Moretz took to Twitter to voice their opinions on the matter.


Midler's comment is in reference to the infamous sex tape Kardashian made with her ex Ray J in 2003 and the numerous nude photoshoots Kardashian has participated in since then.

Moretz retweeted Midler and added her own two cents.


Midler's joke about Kardashian's nudity—insinuating that we've seen it all before—is an all-too-common criticism in a society that attempts to shame women for choosing to confidently display their naked bodies. Moretz’s comment, though well-intentioned, is equally shameful, perpetuating the notion that women must modestly cover their bodies in order to be respected. Yes, we as women have more to offer than just our bodies, but that does not make it wrong to embrace our bodies, even in full nudity, as Kardashian chose to do.

Before responding to these criticisms, Kardashian first took a jab at haters who have joked about her husband Kanye’s supposed debt by tweeting, “Sorry I’m late to the party guys I was busy cashing my 80 million video game check and transferring 53 million into our joint account.”

She went on to single out Bette Midler and Chloe Grace Moretz for their comments. To Midler, she tweeted, "hey @BetteMidler I know it's past your bedtime but if you're still up and reading this send nudes #justkidding." This joking tweet was followed up with a more pointed one:


Her response to Moretz took things even further:


Then, Kardashian proceeded to tweet yet another nude photo, simply captioned “#liberated.” The hashtag is an important reminder that while some women find empowerment in modesty, others find empowerment in nudity—to each their own. It is not our place to police other women and tell them how they should present themselves.