Barbie Launched A Line Of Dolls Celebrating 'Inspiring Women' & The Internet Is Torn

Barbie released dolls based on ‘inspiring women’ just in time for International Women’s Day on March 8. The dolls included women from all types of backgrounds including Olympic snowboarder Chloe Kim, aviator Amelia Earhart, and NASA mathematician Katherine Johnson, according to CNN

The launch of these dolls is being pushed alongside Barbie’s #MoreRoleModels campaign. In a tweet, Barbie said “We are committed to shining a light on empowering female role models in an effort to inspire more girls.”

The dolls are each shockingly realistic, except for one. Allure pointed out artist Frida Kahlo’s doll minimization of her iconic unibrow and mustache. If you’re familiar with Kahlo, you’d know the significant of her faial hair. It was a symbol of Kahlo’s refusal to give in to traditional feminine beauty standards despite pressures from society. 

Allure noted a few stray hairs above the doll’s nose, but it’s incredibly sparse in comparison to Kahlo’s actual unibrow. From afar, and in most of the promo pictures, Kahlo looks perfectly waxed like the other Barbies. 

So, while the internet celebrated this launch, they also had a lot to say about the erasure of Kahlo’s style and some critiques about the line’s overall diversity. 



Despite the controversy, it's clear that Barbie has come a long way since it was first launched. The first black Barbie, Christie, didn't come out until 10 years after Barbie's initial launch, according to People. It wasn't until the late 90s that the first Barbie in a wheelchair came out—and it was quickly criticized because her wheelchair didn't fit through the doors of the Barbie Dreamhouse, PRI reported

One of their most notable expansions to the line was the inclusion of Barbies of all shapes and sizes in a 2016 launch. This was the first time that Barbies came in any size besides skinny-and-tall in their history. 

This latest launch was clearly done with good intentions to inspire young girls that they really can grow up to be anything, but a crucial oversight of some of the details may have hurt their message. 

(Photo Credits: Cover)

About The Author

Currently an undergraduate student at American Univerisity, Katie is studying Political Science with a minor in Communication Studies. When she has free time, she enjoys visiting art museums and going to concerts. 

Find her on Instagram here