Tam Jumbala

More by Tam Jumbala

Halfway

2/25/2013

 

HALFWAY is an art show featuring work by a group of talented friends. They describe their show as “a collaborative exhibition by eleven sophomores who happen to be halfway between home, art, and real life.” Their art is about “that space in between or that time in the middle,” a feeling or sensibility that most if not all college students can get behind and relate to. The spirit of the show is open, casual and celebratory – there is a real sense of joy in the playful coming together of different creative minds; artists that display with their own names and with show pseudonyms such as WESASO, WISE GUY, DA SARGE and BARHOL. Artists include: Wes Sanders, Danny Sobor, Elizabeth Cox, Sarah Weiss, Lee Bernstein, Ignacio Semerene, Nicole Hasslinger, Emily Toomey, Caleb Weinreb, Katy Windemuth, and Chae Lin Suh.

The nature of the show’s reception echoed this ethos – supporters gathered to drink and eat and listen to live music, provided by student groups Clyde Lawrence & Company and The Arun Janssens Combo. The variety of art is definitely exciting. There are mixed media pieces, screen-prints, works in glass, and a broad range of subjects and styles; from abstraction to figurative and narrative work. Check it out! It won’t disappoint. 

Safe Haven: Not Just Another Chick Flick?

2/25/2013

 

Safe Haven, the latest film adaptation of a Nicholas Sparks novel, was released this past Valentine's Day. For those who haven’t had a chance to see it, here’s what to expect: A mysterious young woman named Katie (played by Julianne Hough) appears in Southport, North Carolina. She is determined to avoid forming close ties to members of this small, tight-knit community. Despite her efforts in closing herself off, she comes to befriend her neighbor Jo and Alex (Josh Duhamel), a widowed storeowner with two young children. As Katie begins to fall in love, the past that she has been running away from finally catches up with her and she is faced with a difficult decision – stay and live a life with love, or run in search of a fleeting sense of safety.

Past film adaptations of Sparks’ novels include The Notebook, Dear John, and The Lucky One. All deal with passionate, deeply felt romances and the obstacles that must be overcome in order to pursue or salvage that love, as well as the joy and tragedy that goes with facing such challenges. Each storyline brings in a serious element – Alzheimer’s, the war in Iraq, the strange relationships we form with death and the deceased. The trailer for Safe Haven suggests it is as much a touching, if not cheesy, romance as its predecessors are. However, as Lasse Hallstrom is directing it – his work includes Chocolat (2000) and the Academy Award winning drama, The Cider House Rules (1999) – we might expect a more dramatic treatment of the dangerous past that Katie is trying to escape from.

The Bluest Eye

12/23/2012

 

The Bluest Eye - Campus Review   Toni Morrison’s book, The Bluest Eye, is adapted by Lydia Diamond and directed by Jarrett Key ’13. Performances ran on campus at Leeds Theatre this past week. The story centres on Pecola Breedlove (Jenna Spencer ’14), a young girl enduring psychological and sexual abuse in an unstable home in post-Depression Ohio. We watch her parents fight, in an abstract stage dance that conveys violence while avoiding graphic sensationalism. The marker of the Breedlove family, the audience is told, is their ugliness. Pecola is fragile and insecure. Every night, she longs to look white. She desperately prays for blonde hair and blue eyes, reminiscent of Shirley Temple and her Mary Jane candies, so that she might be acknowledged, so that bad things stop happening to her and that she might be considered equal. Most of the play is narrated by Pecola’s friends, Claudia MacTeer (Becky Bass ’13) and her sister Frieda MacTeer (Shadura Lee ’16). The production shines as an adaptation of Morrison’s novel. Its lyricality is translated to stage through music, rhythm and movement. The play offers a moving window into post-Depression Ohio. It convincingly tells another’s story, but is also compelling because it so successfully conjures universal feelings of love, hurt, shame, inadequacy and sadness. Thoughtfully staged and excellently executed; violence, trauma, pleasure and the pain of racial memory are all evoked with elegant choreography and wonderfully nuanced acting. The Bluest Eye was a beautifully poignant experience.

Samsara: A Trip Around the World

11/27/2012

 

In Baraka (1992), director Ron Fricke and writer Mark Magidson team up to reveal to viewers a plethora of strange and unknown pockets of life. It begins in the morning. There are landscapes and people at prayer. The cinematography is striking; we see volcanoes, waterfalls and dense forests. The documentary seems to ebb and flow – there are moments of silence and moments of movement, of rushing water and the low vibration of several hundred monks chanting. Tribes apply body paint and dance. There is no dialogue, text or narration. Instead, we are left to admire the images for what they are. The film then moves to focus on destruction – forests are logged, landscapes are mined. The viewer is confronted with images of poverty, industrialization and war. As it ends, it circles back to new beginning: prayer and nature return.

Nature and man are now often presented as diametrically opposed (there is nature and the man-made; the machine and the hectic urban lifestyle that we associate ‘man’ with). Here, we see them for what they really are: intrinsically linked. Baraka is a beautiful documentary. It can only be described as an awe-inspiring tapestry of human experience and the natural world. The work is long, sometimes tiringly so, but it is also meditative and ultimately inspiring: there is ruin in the world, but wonder and hope too.

SexPowerGod

11/13/2012

 

With midterms, Hurricane Sandy and Halloween behind us, it’s time to think about the events of November, namely SexPowerGod. As a tradition and legend of Brown University, SexPowerGod (SPG) is an annual party thrown by the Brown LGBTQ group in Alumnae Hall, drawing a lively crowd from both Brown and RISD. It gained notoriety through its unique use of multimedia with partiers being provided identifying numbers upon entry – they were once temporary tattoos to be applied on the body – and large projector screens publicly relaying messages by number; typically flattering comments and sexual propositions.

In 2005, the party was featured on Bill O’Reilley’s nationally televised show ‘The O’Reilly Factor’ on Fox News. Jesse Watters gained access to the party and (creepily) shot footage of attendees. He appears on the show to condemn and elaborate on the “debauchery” that he witnessed. The Brown student community met the broadcast with general outrage, while university administration saw to the tightening of rules and consequent taming of SPG.

For those of you who have attended, you know the drill. For those of you who camped out for the first time and got tickets, here’s a rundown of what to expect:

Horror Movies for Halloween

11/13/2012

 

With Halloweek fast approaching, we're suggesting a selection – old and new – of Hollywood's freakiest flicks to get you into the Halloween spirit. Whatever your taste for scary movies may be – ghosts, zombies, serial killers, rabid dogs – there’s something in here for you.

 

Paranormal Activity (2007)

Director: Oren Peli

Writer: Oren Peli

With the release of Paranormal Activity in theaters, it seemed appropriate to pay homage to the chilling original - a low-budget, single-camera movie about a couple that moves into a suburban home who are increasingly disturbed by a nightly demonic presence. Oren Peli forgoes story and visual effects for an anxiety-inducing build, and all of that slow-building tension really pays off.

 

Cujo (1983)

Director: Lewis Teague

Writers: Stephen King (novel), Don Carlos Dunnaway and Lauren Currier

Stephen King's novel 'Cujo' is adapted for the silver screen. A St. Bernard named 'Cujo' is infected with rabies and proceeds to terrorize a small American town. Cynophobes stay away.

 

The Omen (1976)

Director: Richard Donner

Writer: David Seltzer

An American ambassador learns that his son is the literal Antichrist. It is considered one of the best films of 1976, and one of the best horror films of all time, holding an 82% 'Fresh' rating on the Rotten Tomatoes website and ranking number 81 on '100 Years… 100 Thrills', a list of America's scariest films. The movie boasts some gnarly decapitation scenes and, if creepy children freak you out, little Damien will be sure to burrow a hole in your conscience and plague your dreams.

 

The Hills Have Eyes (2006)

Director: Alexandre Aja

Writers: Alexandre Aja, Gregory Levasseur and Wes Craven

Staying Healthy in College

10/26/2012

Exercise:
Fitting exercise into your busy college schedule can be difficult, but our campus makes it relatively easy for students to get exercise. If you're bored of your regular gym regimen, find ways to mix it up with Brown's Group Fitness Pass! It gives you unlimited access to a fantastic selection of aerobic, fitness and mind/body classes. Classes include Cardio Blast, Body Sculpt, Zumba and Vinyasa Yoga. 305 Fitness at Hillel is another fun and physical way to stay fit. Yoga, tai chi or qigong are excellent ways of melting away built-up stress by combining deep breathing with stretching and movement and can be done easily in your room.
Trying something new will work your body and cardiovascular system in a different way from your regular workout, yielding more noticeable results. Regular physical activity controls weight and combats diseases. It can improve your overall mood, stamina and sex life. How many more reasons do you need to get moving?
If you're not feeling a walk to the OMAC or the nearest gym, incorporate physical fitness into your daily routine - walk or bike to class, dance on a night out, or clean your room to your favorite album.

A Healthy Diet:
Eating right is vital to staying healthy. As with exercise, a healthy diet controls weight and boosts your immune system. Try to always eat breakfast - grabbing a granola bar or a piece of fruit before running out the door goes a long way in keeping you active and preventing you from overeating throughout the day. Indulge on treats but also make an effort to maintain a balanced diet; keep things like pre-cut vegetables, fruit, nuts and cheese in your fridge.

Chug Water:
Drink plenty of water every day. Dehydration makes you more vulnerable to getting sick and feeling tired. By the time you notice you're thirsty, you're likely to already be dehydrated - try not to get to that point and down liquids throughout the day.

84th Academy Awards

3/4/2012

Closer

2/28/2012

Hedi Slimane is a photographer with an extremely large and impressive body of work. He's had a number of solo exhibitions and has shot for French Vogue, Vogue Homme Japan, Paris Dior Homme, Yves Saint Laurent and more. His subjects draw heavily from popular culture, popular music, and the silver screen. These beautiful, poignant images delight in celebrity, sex, beauty and youth - a large part of what makes television and hollywood so exciting. Here are portraits, in order, of late singer/songwriter Amy Winehouse, supermodel Anya Rubik, talented artist John Baldessari, Robert de Niro, and Alex Pettyfer (who was part of Slimane's Young Hollywood series).

[Photos to follow shortly]

Hedi Slimane: Art in Entertainment

2/27/2012

Hedi Slimane is a photographer with an extremely large and impressive body of work. He's had a number of solo exhibitions and has shot for French Vogue, Vogue Homme Japan, Paris Dior Homme, Yves Saint Laurent and more. His subjects draw heavily from popular culture, popular music, and the silver screen. These beautiful, poignant images delight in celebrity, sex, beauty and youth - a large part of what makes television and hollywood so exciting. Here are portraits, in order, of late singer/songwriter Amy Winehouse, supermodel Anya Rubik, talented artist John Baldessari, Robert de Niro, and Alex Pettyfer (who was part of Slimane's  Young Hollywood Series).